1689 Baptist Confession of Faith: The Trinity

The Trinity is one way that the Godhead is described in Scripture. Even though the word "Trinity" doesn't appear in the Bible, the teachings of it range from Genesis to Revelation. As a Baptist, there hasn't been any better explanation of this doctrine in short than the 1689 Baptist Confession. I hope it will expand your understanding and faith by pointing you back to God's Word. I also hope it will increase your appreciation for the mystery and diversity of God (Isaiah 55:8-11).

Chapter 2 GOD AND THE HOLY TRINITY
2.1 The Lord our God is the one and only living and true God.1
His substance is in and of himself, he is infinite in being and perfection.2 His essence cannot be understood by any but himself.3 He is an absolutely pure spirit, invisible, without body, parts or passions. He alone has immortality, living in light which no one can approach.4 He is immutable, immense, eternal, incomprehensible, almighty, in every way infinite, perfectly holy, perfectly wise, absolutely free, completely absolute.5 He works all things according to the counsel of his own immutable and entirely righteous will for his own glory.6
He is perfectly loving, gracious, merciful, long-suffering, abundant in goodness and truth; he forgives iniquity, transgression and sin.7 He is the re warder of those who diligently seek him, yet at the same time he is entirely just and terrible in his judgments, hating all sin, and he will by no means clear the guilty.8
(1) Deu 6:4; Jer 10:10; 1Co 8:4,6; 1Th 1:9
(2) Isa 48:12
(3) Exo 3:14; Job 11:7-8; 26:14; Psa 145:3; Rom 11:33-34
(4) Joh 4:24;1Ti 1:17; Deu 4:15-16; Luk 24:39; Act 14:11,15; Jas 5:17
(5) Mal 3:6; Jas 1:17; 1Ki 8:27; Jer 23:23-24; Psa 90:2; 1Ti 1:17; Gen 17:1; Rev 4:8; Isa 6:3; Rom 16:27; Psa 115:3; Ex 3:14
(6) Eph 1:11; Isa 46:10; Pro 16:4; Rom 11:36
(7) Exo 34:6-7; 1Jo 4:8
(8) Heb 11:6; Neh 9:32-33; Psa 5:4-6; Nah 1:2-3; Exo 34:7
2.2 God has all life, glory, goodness, blessedness in and of himself; he is unique in being, all-sufficient in and to himself, not standing in need of any creature which he has made, nor deriving any glory from them, but rather demonstrating his own glory in them, through them, to them, and upon them.1
He alone is the source of all being, from whom, through whom, and to whom are all things;
He has absolute sovereign dominion over all creatures, to do through them, for them, or to them whatever he pleases.2
In his sight all things are open and plain, his knowledge is infinite, infallible, and independent of created beings, so for him nothing is contingent or uncertain.3
He is perfectly holy in all his plans, in all his works, and in all his commands.4
Angels and human beings owe him, as creatures to the Creator, worship, service, and obedience, and whatever else he is pleased to require of them.5
(1) Joh 5:26; Act 7:2; Psa 148:13; 119:68; 1Ti 6:15; Job 22:2-3; Act 17:24-25
(2) Rev 4:11; 1Ti 6:15; Rom 11:34-36; Dan 4:25,34-35
(3) Heb 4:13; Rom 11:33-34; Psa 147:5; Act 15:18; Eze 11:5
(4) Psa 145:17; Rom 7:12
(5) Rev 5:12-14
2.3 In this divine and infinite Being there are three persons, the Father, the Son (or the Word) and the Holy Spirit.1 They are one in substance, power, and eternity, each having the whole divine essence, yet this essence is undivided.2
The Father is not derived from anyone, he is neither begotten nor proceeding; the Son is eternally begotten of the Father; the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son.3 All three are infinite, without beginning, and therefore but one God, who is not to be divided in nature and being. Yet they are distinguished by several distinctive characteristics and personal relations.
This doctrine of the Trinity is the foundation of all our fellowship with God, and of the comfort of our dependence on him.
(1) Mat 3:16-17; 28:19; 2Co 13:14
(2) Exo 3:14; Joh 14:11; 1Co 8:4-6
(3) Pro 8:22-31; Joh 1:1-3,14,18; 3:16; 10:36; 15:26; 16:28; Heb 1:2; 1Jo 4:14; Gal 4:4-6

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